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Posts Tagged ‘symbolism’

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Brown

In my other life, I am a member of the Society for Creative Anachronism (SCA), and one of my particular areas of interest is prayer beads. The rosary wasn’t standardized until the 1560s, but there were various forms of prayer beads used in Christian Europe for the previous few hundred years, and the rosary became the best known one and most associated with Roman Catholicism.

Petralia (2)

Cusano

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Gordon (2)

Gordon (1)

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In a tiny little veterans section of Lake View Cemetery, I found a more diverse selection of the emblems of belief available for government headstones for veterans. All the available emblems are listed here.

The most common one that I see is described simply as a Christian Cross.
Wilson

Sgt. Eddie Fields’ stone has the symbol for the United Methodist Church.
Fields (2)

The Roberts selected the emblem for the Unitarian Church/Unitarian Universalist Association.
Roberts (1)

The emblem for the United Church of Christ tops Sgt. Yancey’s stone.
Yancey (1)

Cpl. Mack Crosby has the Episcopal Cross.
Crosby (1)

The Didios’ stone has a symbol designated as representing “Christian Church.”
Didio

The Nesbitts have a Star of David, representative of Judaism.
Nesbit

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Jones (1)

I’m not sure that this photo really does this stone justice.  The artwork is crisp and beautifully rendered, but in the unseasonably warm and sunny weather last weekend, the thing that stopped me in my tracks was the sparkle.  The gold on the stone is not just a flatly applied color, but is textured, so that it catches the light and makes the stone glow.

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Walker

Dennis Jon Walker’s tombstone is so dense with information about him that I stopped the car to see it.  On top, in addition to his name and dates of his birth and death, you get his nickname and the important familial relationships in his life.

Walker (2)

I’m going to assume that the hose, hoe, and rake are representative of an interest in gardening or landscaping, and I think that the phrase under the globe is “world traveler.”  Clearly, dirt and dust are not friendly to this artwork.  And his career – a UPS worker, it appears.

Walker (3)

And on this side, we have hobbies – biking and fishing.  The Ohio State symbol – an alumnus, or just a sports fan?

Walker (4)

And on the front, a nicely artistic integration of yet another interest, photography, with his portrait.

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Wagner

I know exactly why I took this photograph. “Whitey” was not just Lewis Wagner’s nickname, it was also my maternal grandfather’s. I’ve posted before about how fascinating I find names, and that includes nicknames. I suppose my grandfather could have gotten the name “Whitey” from a brief period of time where he had white hair, but the photos I have seen of him indicate he began losing his hair fairly young and took the same approach my middle brother has to the problem – purposely buzzing or shaving the remaining hair makes it much less obvious how much of it has disappeared.

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Nelson

Nelson (2)</a

Nelson (5)

There’s so much to learn about Dale Nelson’s life from his tombstone: his parents’ names, that his and his 3 siblings’ names all started with D, and that he served in Vietnam as a Navy operations specialist. He was also an Ohio State University fan, if not an alumnus. I can’t tell from my photos if that football helmet is supposed to be colored to represent a particular team or just a general enjoyment of football.

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You tell me – is that a bow tie?

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Sacred to the memory of Alexander Doull, Colonel of Artillery in the Army of the Potomac, previously lieutenant in the Royal British Artillery

The inscription on Colonel Doull’s tombstone reminds us of a fact about the United States Civil War that be forgotten – the important role that immigrants played in the armies. About 25% of the Union army was estimated to be foreign-born immigrants. With the rate of immigration in the 19th century, we also have to assume that there was a significant slice of the United States-born soldiers who had parents or grandparents who were immigrants.

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Recently, I wrote about the Christian symbolism associated with the combination of the Greek letters alpha and omega. I’ve found even more photos that include this and wanted to share them with you.

The Holley family in Lake View Cemetery has them intertwined.

Holley

The Smiths of Forest Lawn Cemetery included the alpha and the omega symbols on their marker.

Smith

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