Posts Tagged ‘sculpture’

The winged hourglass is a symbol of mortality, but it is a much rarer find than a weeping willow or an urn. Imagine my delight when I found multiple examples in the Olmstead family plot in Harrisburg Cemetery.


Olmsted 5//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

A winged hourglass adorns each step down to the family plot.

Olmsted 3//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Olmsted 13//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Olmsted 10//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

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Harrisburg Cemetery has a lot of lovely old funerary art, and willow trees are a personal favorite of mine.

I’m guessing based on proximity to another monument that the surname on this one is Haehlen as well. It’s a slightly different style of willow than I’ve posted in the past.


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On a trip to south central Pennsylvania to visit my family, I noticed that there were zinkers in the Silver Spring Presbyterian churchyard. As fascinated as I am with this type of monument, I had never noticed this well-preserved pair of monuments before.

Parker Sarah and Williams (1)//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Parker Sarah and Williams (1)//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

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I’m probably going to get back into this slowly, especially since my previous attempt to resurrect the blog didn’t take off.

Last year, I had the opportunity to attend an SCA event in Minneapolis, and I turned it into a long weekend including a trip to the Minneapolis Institute of Arts, where I found this.

Roman funerary relief (2)

It’s a funerary relief from Palmyra, and the informational text specifically mentions that this type of art is the primary form of sculpture we have from Roman Palmyra.

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To the memory of John Skelton Thompson
Francis John Langley Kinkead
Thomas Leopold Roberts
who all three perished on one day by drowning in Loch Corrie 17 August 1887
moved with pity for so sad a catastrophe, the citizens of Galway had this monument erected.

They were lovely and pleasant in their lives and in death they were not divided.

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Frank Irvin

The shell on this tombstone in Lake View Cemetery intrigues me.  A shell like this, specifically a scallop shell, is the pilgrimage symbol for Santiago de Compostela in Spain, where there is a shrine to the apostle St. James the Greater.  The shrine holds bones that are reputed to be those of the saint, also the patron saint of Spain, and has been a pilgrimage site for Christians since the 9th century.  Medieval pilgrims would wear a shell as a symbol of their journey, and such scallop shells are still available today.  Did Irvin make this journey and treasure it in such a way that a representation of it was to be on his grave marker?

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