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Posts Tagged ‘occupation’

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The Right Honorable Gerald FitzGibbon was a lawyer and judge, who shared both his name and profession with his father and his son. A graduate of the University of Dublin, he served in several prominent legal positions, including Law Adviser to the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, Solicitor General of Ireland, Lord Justice of the Irish Court of Appeal.

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Carolan (3)

Turlough O’Carolan, who went by Carolan, was a harpist and composer in Ireland. He was born around 1670 in County Meath and moved to Ballyfornan with his family when his father was hired by the MacDermott family. Mrs. MacDermott provided for Carolan’s education, including lessons in music and poetry. Despite a bout of smallpox that left him blind around age 18, Carolan became an itinerant musician. Soon, he began composing, creating a musical legacy. You can hear some of his melodies here.

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In the Silver Spring Presbyterian Churchyard, previous pastors still watch over the flock.

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Denning

Transcription: ERECTED BY THE STATE OF PENNSYLVANIA IN MEMORY OF WILLIAM DENNING, THE PATRIOTIC BLACKSMITH AND FORGER OF WROUGHT-IRON CANNON DURING THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR BORN 1737 DIED 1830

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Henry Rogers Selden

Henry Rogers Selden was a lawyer, judge and politician, serving in such positions as Lieutenant Governor of New York. But the reason I photographed his grave marker is that Selden defended Susan B. Anthony in 1873. Anthony and a number of her fellow suffragists decided to test the constitutionality of denying women the right to vote, and Anthony presented her research and arguments to Selden. He found them compelling and told her that he thought she had a right to vote. She voted in the national election of 1872 and was arrested for illegal voting. Selden defended her during the case pro bono, and was extremely disappointed at her conviction.

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Elroy Curtis

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Frank Irvin

The shell on this tombstone in Lake View Cemetery intrigues me.  A shell like this, specifically a scallop shell, is the pilgrimage symbol for Santiago de Compostela in Spain, where there is a shrine to the apostle St. James the Greater.  The shrine holds bones that are reputed to be those of the saint, also the patron saint of Spain, and has been a pilgrimage site for Christians since the 9th century.  Medieval pilgrims would wear a shell as a symbol of their journey, and such scallop shells are still available today.  Did Irvin make this journey and treasure it in such a way that a representation of it was to be on his grave marker?

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Boyd (2)

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Guinness (2)

The name Guinness may be world-famous for brewing, but they played other roles in Irish history. Sir Benjamin Lee Guinness was the grandson of Arthur Guinness, founder of the brewery. Born in Dublin in 1798, Benjamin became Lord Mayor of Dublin, and in 1865, he was elected to the House of Commons to represent his native city. His statue sits outside St. Patrick’s Cathedral because he personally funded the restoration of the cathedral in the early 1860s. He was made a baronet in recognition of this philanthropy.

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