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Posts Tagged ‘maryland’

I’ve written before about the Irish Brigade in the American Civil War. At Antietam, I found their monument.

Irish Brigade (2)

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Mumma Cemetery (1)//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

In the middle of the Antietam National Battlefield, you come upon a cemetery.

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In 1862, Samuel and Elizabeth Mumma resided on 150 acres of this land, including the cemetery, with their ten children. By the time of the battle, the cemetery had existed for more than 60 years. Prior to the Mummas, the Orndorff family owned this farm, and Major Christian Orndorff was interred in the cemetery in 1797. The Mummas acquired the property in 1811.

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As troops approached Sharpsburg, the Mumma family fled their farm and took shelter at a nearby church. When they returned after the battle, they discovered that Confederates had burned their farmhouse to prevent it from being used by Union sharpshooters.

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In the 1870s, the family deeded the land to allow burials of other community members, particularly congregants from nearby Dunker Church – itself constructed on land donated by the family prior to the war.

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Original quilt (1)

Original quilt (2)

On the way home this weekend, we made an impulsive stop at Antietam National Battlefield just outside Sharpsburg, Maryland. It was a whim, but we really couldn’t have picked a better time. Not only was there an artillery demonstration by a crew of re-enactors, but there was a textile display, and one of the central pieces was this quilt. It’s different from what I used to post about. The Pry Memory quilt was created when, following the battle, the Pry family moved to Tennessee. The signatures on the quilt blocks allowed the piece to be traced back to its origins.

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James H. Williamson

James H. Williamson

One hundred and fifty years ago today, James H. Williamson fell at the Battle of South Mountain in Maryland. As the Army of the Potomac pursued the Army of Northern Virginia through Maryland, they clashed over three mountain passes – Crampton’s, Turner’s, and Fox’s Gaps. Under the command of Major General George McClellan, the Union army forced General Robert E. Lee’s army into retreat but did not pursue them quickly. Three days later, the armies would clash again in a much better known engagement, the Battle of Antietam.

The Battle of South Mountain, Civil War Trust.
South Mountain, CWSAC Battle Summaries.

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