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Posts Tagged ‘cremation’

Two things struck me about this monument. The first was wondering what used to sit on the base we now see, but I don’t have any answers for that, so let’s move to the second one.

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The second thing that caught my eyes was the fact that it specifies the Pfeiffers were cremated.  Cremation was not a common practice in the United States – the first crematories were not opened until the last quarter of the 19th century, and it slowly grew in popularity.  Even now, only about 25% of the deceased in the United States are cremated.

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Newberry Monument

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In Lakeview Cemetery, there is an interesting monument to the Newberry family. The plot looks like most family plots, with one large family monument surrounded by markers for individuals.

Newberry Monument

But on the side of the Newberry monument are two cenotaphs of sorts – metal plaques that memorialize members of the family whose remains lie elsewhere.

Newberry Monument

The first tells us of Roger Cleveland Newberry, who was 26 years old when he died in World War II. According to the records in the Cleveland Public Library Necrology file, Newberry left behind a mother and a brother William Jr. who was also serving in the war when he died in action in 1943. His father, William Belknap Newberry, Sr., had already passed away in 1930.

Newberry Monument
The second plaque is for Roger’s nephew, John van Winkle Newberry, his brother’s son. John must have been a sailor – the marker tells us that the reason John is not here in Lakeview with the family is because his ashes are somewhere in the ocean.

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