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Posts Tagged ‘civil war’

100_2211

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There aren’t a lot of crosses in Gettysburg National Military Park. The 142nd Pennsylvania has this rough-hewn, rugged cross.

142nd Pennsylvania Infantry

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100_0399

You’ve probably never heard of this particular Charles Dickinson, but it’s likely that you are familiar with his wife. In 1853, Dickinson was a musician in a traveling variety show, and he married one of the actresses, born Harriet Wood, but known to history as Pauline Cushman. Dickinson and his bride eventually returned to his hometown of Cleveland, Ohio, where he found work as a music teacher. The couple lived with Dickinson’s parents and had two children, Charlie and Ida. At the end of 1861, Dickinson enlisted as a musician and marched off to the Civil War. In less than a year, he was discharged home in extremely poor health. He expired almost exactly a year after his enlistment. Cushman left her children with her husband’s family and resumed her acting career. Not long after, the opportunity presented itself to become a spy for the Union Army. Once she was discovered to be a spy and narrowly escaped execution, Cushman continued to travel the lecture circuit talking about her exploits. She was not present when either of her children by Dickinson died. The rift between Cushman and her first husband’s family, who resented what they considered her abandonment of her maternal duties, never healed.

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100_0442

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Sacred to the Memory of Michael Kneafsey

To the memory of Michael Kneafsey
Born in Galway, Ireland
Died at(?) Carlisle Barracks
Oct. 3 (?), 1862
Aged 26 years

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Colwell (4)

One hundred and fifty years ago today near Sharpsburg, Maryland, the Army of Northern Virginia and the Army of the Potomac clashed in what would live on to this day as the bloodiest one day battle in United States history.. At the end of the day, the casualties numbered nearly 23,000. Captain James Colwell was among the dead. A Carlisle, Pennsylvania, lawyer, Colwell responded to President Lincoln’s call for volunteers and enlisted at the start of the Civil War. He was named 1st Lieutenant of the 7th Pennsylvania Reserves/36th Pennsylvania Volunteers and promoted to Captain the July before his death. When Colwell fell at the battle of Antietam, he left behind a wife and four children.

Another blog post about Colwell can be found here.

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James H. Williamson

James H. Williamson

One hundred and fifty years ago today, James H. Williamson fell at the Battle of South Mountain in Maryland. As the Army of the Potomac pursued the Army of Northern Virginia through Maryland, they clashed over three mountain passes – Crampton’s, Turner’s, and Fox’s Gaps. Under the command of Major General George McClellan, the Union army forced General Robert E. Lee’s army into retreat but did not pursue them quickly. Three days later, the armies would clash again in a much better known engagement, the Battle of Antietam.

The Battle of South Mountain, Civil War Trust.
South Mountain, CWSAC Battle Summaries.

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Wing (3)

Even though it’s mostly worn away, you can tell that below G.W. Wing’s name, there was information about what unit her served in during the Civil War. Even if that information wasn’t on there, I have only ever seen the flag that is carved above his name on the graves of soldiers. The interlocked rings probably symbolize membership in a fraternal organization. He also died during the war, on October 1, 1863, but the tombstone doesn’t tell us how. Statistically, it’s likely he died of disease, but without more information, I’ll probably never know.

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Gifford (3)

Based on some research on the 124th OVI that Thomas Gifford was a part of, I think the inscription here says that he was killed in the Battle of Dallas, Georgia. The battle was actually a series of smaller engagements that occurred in late May and early June of 1864 that were part of the Atlanta campaign.

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Myer

Walden Myer (2)

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