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Posts Tagged ‘cenotaph’

Did you know there is a water fountain just outside Edinburgh Castle dedicated to those executed as witches in the 16th and 17th centuries? The “Witchcraft Acts” codified witchcraft as a criminal offense. In 1541, The Act against Conjurations, Witchcraft, Sorcery and Enchantments defined witchcraft as a felony, punishable by death and forfeiture of property to the state. The 1563 Act further defined not just the practice of witchcraft, but the consultation of a witch, as punishable by death. King James VI (later James I of England) demonstrated a particular obsession with witches, even publishing a book, Daemonologie, and participating in the interrogation of accused witches. He took that interest with him when he assumed the English throne. In 1604, another law was passed that further bolstered prosecution of witches: An Act against Conjuration, Witchcraft and dealing with evil and wicked spirits, and hundreds of witches would be tried and executed.

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The Temple Bar (8)

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In memory of the Claddagh men (1) In memory of the Claddagh men (2)

I tried to find more information about the tragic drowning of 8 men on Galway Bay on 1902.  I found a lot of websites that included no more information than what is carved on this memorial.  The only additional detail I located was that the men were sailing back from a wedding.

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Browne (1)//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Browne (2)//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

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Stanford

Charles Villiers Stanford was a composer, conductor, and teacher of music.  He spent his childhood in Dublin enjoying many opportunities to hear concerts and performances with his parents, both amateur musicians.  He attended Cambridge University before studying under composers in Leipzig and Germany.  Stanford composed music of his own and taught at the Royal College of Music in London.

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Fitzgibbon (2)//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Fitzgibbon (1)//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

The Right Honorable Gerald FitzGibbon was a lawyer and judge, who shared both his name and profession with his father and his son. A graduate of the University of Dublin, he served in several prominent legal positions, including Law Adviser to the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, Solicitor General of Ireland, Lord Justice of the Irish Court of Appeal.

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Carolan (3)

Turlough O’Carolan, who went by Carolan, was a harpist and composer in Ireland. He was born around 1670 in County Meath and moved to Ballyfornan with his family when his father was hired by the MacDermott family. Mrs. MacDermott provided for Carolan’s education, including lessons in music and poetry. Despite a bout of smallpox that left him blind around age 18, Carolan became an itinerant musician. Soon, he began composing, creating a musical legacy. You can hear some of his melodies here.

Carolan (1)

Carolan (4)

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