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Abbey graveyard (17) Abbey graveyard (30)

These photos continue my post from yesterday about the abbey and cemetery on Donegal Bay. The photos I’ve selected for today show a lot more of the abbey ruins.

Abbey graveyard (43)

As I mentioned in yesterday’s post, the graves date much later than the abbey, so a lot of the memorials are actually within the footprint of the old buildings.

Abbey ruins (22)

Abbey ruins (2) Abbey ruins (1)

Abbey ruins (3)

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Browne (1)//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Browne (2)//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

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Stanford

Charles Villiers Stanford was a composer, conductor, and teacher of music.  He spent his childhood in Dublin enjoying many opportunities to hear concerts and performances with his parents, both amateur musicians.  He attended Cambridge University before studying under composers in Leipzig and Germany.  Stanford composed music of his own and taught at the Royal College of Music in London.

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Brannigan and Learmouth//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

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Mumma Cemetery (1)//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

In the middle of the Antietam National Battlefield, you come upon a cemetery.

Mumma Cemetery (12)//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

In 1862, Samuel and Elizabeth Mumma resided on 150 acres of this land, including the cemetery, with their ten children. By the time of the battle, the cemetery had existed for more than 60 years. Prior to the Mummas, the Orndorff family owned this farm, and Major Christian Orndorff was interred in the cemetery in 1797. The Mummas acquired the property in 1811.

Mumma Cemetery (4)//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

As troops approached Sharpsburg, the Mumma family fled their farm and took shelter at a nearby church. When they returned after the battle, they discovered that Confederates had burned their farmhouse to prevent it from being used by Union sharpshooters.

Mumma Cemetery (13)//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

In the 1870s, the family deeded the land to allow burials of other community members, particularly congregants from nearby Dunker Church – itself constructed on land donated by the family prior to the war.

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Ringwalt Lewis

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Harrisburg Cemetery has a lot of lovely old funerary art, and willow trees are a personal favorite of mine.

I’m guessing based on proximity to another monument that the surname on this one is Haehlen as well. It’s a slightly different style of willow than I’ve posted in the past.

Haehlen

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