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Mumma Cemetery (1)//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

In the middle of the Antietam National Battlefield, you come upon a cemetery.

Mumma Cemetery (12)//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

In 1862, Samuel and Elizabeth Mumma resided on 150 acres of this land, including the cemetery, with their ten children. By the time of the battle, the cemetery had existed for more than 60 years. Prior to the Mummas, the Orndorff family owned this farm, and Major Christian Orndorff was interred in the cemetery in 1797. The Mummas acquired the property in 1811.

Mumma Cemetery (4)//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

As troops approached Sharpsburg, the Mumma family fled their farm and took shelter at a nearby church. When they returned after the battle, they discovered that Confederates had burned their farmhouse to prevent it from being used by Union sharpshooters.

Mumma Cemetery (13)//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

In the 1870s, the family deeded the land to allow burials of other community members, particularly congregants from nearby Dunker Church – itself constructed on land donated by the family prior to the war.

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Ringwalt Lewis

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Harrisburg Cemetery has a lot of lovely old funerary art, and willow trees are a personal favorite of mine.

I’m guessing based on proximity to another monument that the surname on this one is Haehlen as well. It’s a slightly different style of willow than I’ve posted in the past.


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On a trip to south central Pennsylvania to visit my family, I noticed that there were zinkers in the Silver Spring Presbyterian churchyard. As fascinated as I am with this type of monument, I had never noticed this well-preserved pair of monuments before.

Parker Sarah and Williams (1)//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Parker Sarah and Williams (1)//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

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Reboot and refresh

Sorry I’ve fallen away from the blog.  I am coming back, but thanks to a change in Flickr’s terms of service, I need to edit pretty much every link I’ve ever posted to my photos.  It’s going to take a while, but once that’s done, I’ll try to start posting again.

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Henry Rogers Selden

Henry Rogers Selden was a lawyer, judge and politician, serving in such positions as Lieutenant Governor of New York. But the reason I photographed his grave marker is that Selden defended Susan B. Anthony in 1873. Anthony and a number of her fellow suffragists decided to test the constitutionality of denying women the right to vote, and Anthony presented her research and arguments to Selden. He found them compelling and told her that he thought she had a right to vote. She voted in the national election of 1872 and was arrested for illegal voting. Selden defended her during the case pro bono, and was extremely disappointed at her conviction.

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The epitaph on this stone is from the Te Deum, a hymn that remains in use in the modern Catholic church as well as some of the Protestant sects. It dates to approximately the 4th century.

Now I need all of you to be honest with me. How many of you clicked on the link because it sounds like a line from The Boondock Saints?

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