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Posts Tagged ‘veteran’

Vietnam Memorial

When you mention the Vietnam Veterans’ Memorial in Washington, D.C., most people think of the Wall. There was a lot of controversy concerning that memorial, so let me state that while I’m not showing it here, it is not because I dislike it. The Wall is powerful. But I’ve always been drawn to more literal depictions of things, rather than abstracts, so I wanted to take a moment to look at a second portion of the memorial – the statues of the three solders that stand near the etched roll of names.

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Lewis (1)

Lewis (2)

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Wilson

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Lynch

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In a tiny little veterans section of Lake View Cemetery, I found a more diverse selection of the emblems of belief available for government headstones for veterans. All the available emblems are listed here.

The most common one that I see is described simply as a Christian Cross.
Wilson

Sgt. Eddie Fields’ stone has the symbol for the United Methodist Church.
Fields (2)

The Roberts selected the emblem for the Unitarian Church/Unitarian Universalist Association.
Roberts (1)

The emblem for the United Church of Christ tops Sgt. Yancey’s stone.
Yancey (1)

Cpl. Mack Crosby has the Episcopal Cross.
Crosby (1)

The Didios’ stone has a symbol designated as representing “Christian Church.”
Didio

The Nesbitts have a Star of David, representative of Judaism.
Nesbit

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Nelson

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Nelson (5)

There’s so much to learn about Dale Nelson’s life from his tombstone: his parents’ names, that his and his 3 siblings’ names all started with D, and that he served in Vietnam as a Navy operations specialist. He was also an Ohio State University fan, if not an alumnus. I can’t tell from my photos if that football helmet is supposed to be colored to represent a particular team or just a general enjoyment of football.

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100_2269

Melvin Larimer’s stone identifies him as having been an artificer in the Spanish-American War. I might have seen other stones with the designation before, but I hadn’t noticed. On Fort Sumter’s website, I found “artificer” in their FAQ section. Paraphrasing, an artificer would have been an enlisted artillery man with a specialized skill that allowed him to supervise or organize that kind of work.

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