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Posts Tagged ‘spring grove cemetery’

William

So help me out here. I’ve been trying to figure out the name of the farm where this young man died.  I think it’s a capitalized proper noun.  If it helps to know, this photograph is from Spring Grove Cemetery in Cincinnati, and the year of death is 1822, so the location would have existed in the early days of Cincinnati or the outlying areas.

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Feakins (2)

Feakins

Sometimes I treat my trips to cemeteries like a giant scavenger hunt. I’m always seeking the rare and the unique, and one of the things that shows up on that list for me are table tombs. I’ve only found them in three cemeteries so far. A table tomb is…a table made of stone – a flat stone supported by legs or pillars.

I’ve featured this one before, but I’m not sure that I commented on the fact that it was a table tomb.

Ellis (2)

Ellis

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Haly Sarah Haldeman

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I haven’t posted photos of sarcophagi in a while. Sarcophagus tombs in most modern cemeteries just look like they hold a body. The actual person is usually interred below or next to the monument.

Groenbaum (3)

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Farina

Spears

I find a lot of little five-pointed stars on cemetery monuments. Based on a little bit of research, five-pointed stars often are supposed to symbolize Christ, specifically the five wounds of Christ from the crucifixion.

Ida Bell and Nettie Dora Cook

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Other cemetery bloggers I read have noted the presence of five-pointed stars protruding from the foreheads of angel statues in cemeteries. I haven’t found as many as others have found, but these two examples are in Spring Grove Cemetery.

Querner (4)

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I don’t know any more about this monument than what is engraved on the stone. Davis Lawler erected it in memory of his parents – why a Sphinx made an appropriate monument to them, I don’t know. But then, that’s kind of appropriate, isn’t it?

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It’s been a while since I posted photos of sarcophagus tombs. Sarcophagus tombs are those that look like a coffin or similar container for holding a body but do not. The deceased are generally interred in the nearby ground.

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If you walk around enough cemeteries, you’ll notice that many statues and monuments have metal that has taken on a distinctive blue-green hue, just like the Statue of Liberty. If you’re like me, you learned about why this happens in some middle school science class and then promptly forgot. So if you already know this answer, you can skip the rest of this paragraph and just look at the pretty pictures. But for those of you who pushed out this science knowledge to have more room to remember the names of all the Muppets and the entire script of The Princess Bride, stay with me. The metal monuments and statues and plaques that go green because the alloys they are made of contain copper. When copper is exposed to water, it oxidizes and forms a layer that actually protects the metal underneath from degrading further. The patina and color are called verdigris.

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Fraternal monument (3)

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One word: oxidation.

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One of my favorite decorative elements on old tombstones are the little rosettes and carvings that appear on the shoulders of the stone.

Crosby (2)

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