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Archive for the ‘Graveless memorials’ Category

In St. Patrick’s Park in Dublin, Ireland, there is a long brick wall with what is called the Literary Parade. The wall has a series of niches, each of which houses a plaque of a famous Irish author.

Literary Parade

Beckett (2)

Beckett (1)

Behan

Clarke

Dillon (2)

Joyce

Mangan

O'Casey

Shaw

Swift

Synge

Wilde

Yeats

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Ashley at St. Bridget's Well

Ireland has three patron saints: Patrick, Columba, and Brigid (or Bridget). During my 2009 trip to Ireland, our tour guide took us on a brief detour to visit St. Bridget’s Well. Alongside a country road in front of a small cemetery, there is a little concrete, sod-covered cave leading to the well. Those who come to pray at the well leave items behind, creating a colorful, 3D collage.

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Rosaries draped over statuettes at St. Bridget's Well

St. Bridget's Well

St. Bridget's Well

Rosaries, flowers and statue at St. Bridget's Well

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1100 Tombstone of Shaikh al-Husain ibn Abdallah ibn al-Hasan Iran Seljuk (2)

The tombstone of Shaikh al-Husain ibn Abdallah ibn al-Hasan is in the Cleveland Museum of Art. Carved from limestone, it dates to 1110. The carvings include not only the name of the deceased and his death date, but verses from the Qur’an.

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Orestes Sarcophagus, ad 100 125, Greek marble, Roman, Italy (1)

This 2nd century Roman sarcophagus is in the Cleveland Museum of Art.

Orestes Sarcophagus, ad 100 125, Greek marble, Roman, Italy (4)

Orestes Sarcophagus, ad 100 125, Greek marble, Roman, Italy (2)

Orestes Sarcophagus, ad 100 125, Greek marble, Roman, Italy (3)

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Mourner from the Tomb of Philip the Bold, Duke of Burgundy, about 1406-1410, alabaster, Claus de Werve, Netherlandish (1)

In further evidence that I can find funerary monuments anywhere, I took a number of photos of mourner statues at the Cleveland Museum of Art. This statue is from the tomb of Philip the Bold, the Duke of Burgundy. The statue is about 600 years old, dating to the first decade of the 15th century. And those of you who know my other passion for prayer beads, he’s also holding a set of prayer beads.

Mourner from the Tomb of Philip the Bold, Duke of Burgundy, about 1406-1410, alabaster, Claus de Werve, Netherlandish (2)

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Peace Light

The Eternal Peace Light Memorial overlooks the scene of the early fighting of the Battle of Gettysburg, atop Oak Hill. President Franklin Delano Roosevelt dedicated the monument in 1938 as part of the final Blue and Gray reunion on the 75th anniversary of the battle. In attendance were approximately 1,800 remaining veterans of the Union and Confederate armies, the youngest of whom was 88 years old. Built on northern and southern donations, the memorial is topped with an eternal flame. You can hear Roosevelt’s remarks and view photos from the event here.

It’s also the subject of one of the earliest photos I ever took with my own camera that was worth keeping.

1989 Gettysburg Field Trip

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Nearly everything in Trinity Church had a memorial plaque or inscription on it. Unsurprisingly, the baptismal font is dedicated to a little girl who died young. I wonder what it felt like for the parents of Mary Rochester to watch babies be baptized in the font with their daughter’s name on it.

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